Skip to main content

Posts

Dynamic Item Generation

This week I've been fleshing out the dictionaries for my dynamic item generation system.
I made a few changes since it was first designed, like simplifying the materials and making them less exotic. Now there are a lot of normal materials (like COPPER and GLASS) and some exotic or magical materials.

Items are generated with a number of attributes. Which ones they get depends on the type of object, its quality and its material. Here are a few examples:

I think it's going quite well so far, though I'm having to generate a lot of items and check their attributes so I can fine tune the dictionary rules.



You can see the "CLUB$1" up there, which is a rare, ivory, toy club.
I think children's club would be a better attribute than toy. That sounds strange in some cases.



There's a ugly, copper long-sword, which is both blunted and corroded. Items can have several damage attributes, depending on their quality. As they get used in game and pick up more wear and te…
Recent posts

2017 TOTDD Video Diary 2

For anyone who's interested in the newest version of the game you can see the current video diary here:


I'm very happy with the atmosphere of the game so far. I feel like it's something I can work with.

I've got a lot of ideas for the game, but for now I'm just going to keep slogging away trying to get a working gameplay demo.

The schedule so far is:

1. Item generation.
2. Basic player stats.
3. Inventory management.
4. Moving items between the screen and the inventory.
5. Using items to attack and trigger events.

I'm going to be working a lot with messages this time around. That should clear up many of the hurdles I was facing in past versions of t he game.

One problem I had before is that I had to complete both player mechanics, and enemy mechanics simultaneously. A player attacked a monster causing damage directly, the monster had to process that damage and so on.

With messages, I can just send a message and forget about it. It doesn't matter that the m…

Revisiting Treasures of the Deep Dwellers

I ran in to some serious problems with Vinland 1936, so I'm shelving it for now and revisiting an earlier project. Kind of.

Treasure of the deep dwellers was a 3d team based roguelike. Some ways it diverged from standard roguelikes is that it had multiple player characters (a team of 4), real time game play (not turn based) and it had 3d graphics. Unfortunately it was a bit more than I could handle.


The new approach is an attempt to simplify the project so that it can function more like a traditional roguelike. A big problem I had before was keeping track of the 4 agents. They tended to run off or get lost. I had to calculate line of sight and map reveal from all 4 agents. Now I've switched to an "Eye of the Beholder" type setup, where the whole team is contained in a single tile.


Likewise monsters are represented in mobs of up to 4 agents in a single tile.
Other benefits of this type of gameplay is that you never need to see the player's characters (except for t…

Vinland 1936 refactoring.

As usual after finishing a game jam there's loads of stuff that I learned that can help me to make better games. Going back to a work in progress now feels really difficult because so much of the existing code looks ugly and inefficient.

I think I'm going to strip back a lot of the work I've done on V1936 so far and rework it.

Here's the new structure I want to implement:

Before, fog of war, level generation and agent management were all direct elements of the main loop. What this meant was that if I wanted to restart the game or load a new level it was best to reboot the main loop (restart the game), but this has quite high overheads all of its own.

During the making of "The Hole" I implemented a level manager, a container for the level and all agents etc... contained within it. I could pause the level, or reload it or do anything with it, without affecting the main loop. This made it great for adding cutscenes, or menus such as the inventory. It also mad tr…

BGMC 23: Aftermath.

Well another Blender game making contest is finished and as usual it's left me to re-evaluate what games I want to make.

I had great fun making a story based adventure game, and I'd like to set up a collaboration to make another one, with some other artists.

The game would be developed over a set window, like two months and then released immediately, maybe try for steam greenlight. It would be nice to try and do something in a set time span instead of the almost endless development cycles I have with my other games.

Anyway, if you want to play the games from BGMC 23, including mine you can download them here. 15 games to try out for free, that's something you don't see every day. :)

I'll leave with an animation of one of the scenes I designed for the game, a proper matte painting, the first I've ever tried:


Telling a story; Creating a Compelling Narrative.

Telling a story; Creating a Compelling Narrative. In this blog I will talk about my own recent brush with story telling and go on to talk about how tools from creative wring can help you to better author the narrative in your games, whether they have a traditional linear narrative or a procedurally generated interactive narrative.

Narrative and structure in traditional fiction  last week I started writing a story set in the world I'm developing for my game Vinland: 1936.

I hope the story will help me to flesh out my game world and develop my own expanded universe which will be a good place to set my games in the future.

After about a week of work, on and off I've progressed the story to outline stage. For each character thread I have half a dozen chapters which plot a course through the events of the story. Each thread is told from the perspective of a different character.


Actually I started writing as soon as I had my outline, but I've since gone back and deleted what …